Maintenance Notice

Due to necessary scheduled maintenance, the JMIR Publications website will be unavailable from Monday, March 11, 2019 at 4:00 PM to 4:30 PM EST. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this may cause you.

Who will be affected?

Advertisement

Currently accepted at: JMIR Mental Health

Date Submitted: Dec 3, 2017
Open Peer Review Period: Dec 26, 2017 - Feb 1, 2018
Date Accepted: Mar 3, 2018
(closed for review but you can still tweet)

This paper has been accepted and is currently in production.

It will appear shortly on 10.2196/mental.9564

The final accepted version (not copyedited yet) is in this tab.

The final, peer-reviewed published version of this preprint can be found here:

Computerized Cognitive Training in Children With Autism and Intellectual Disabilities: Feasibility and Satisfaction Study

Benyakorn S, Calub CA, Riley SJ, Schneider A, Iosif A, Solomon M, Hessl D, Schweitzer JB

Computerized Cognitive Training in Children With Autism and Intellectual Disabilities: Feasibility and Satisfaction Study

JMIR Ment Health 2018;5(2):e40

DOI: 10.2196/mental.9564

PMID: 29802090

PMCID: 5993974

Computerized Cognitive Training in Children With Autism and Intellectual Disabilities: Feasibility and Satisfaction Study

  • Songpoom Benyakorn; 
  • Catrina A Calub; 
  • Steven J Riley; 
  • Andrea Schneider; 
  • Ana-Maria Iosif; 
  • Marjorie Solomon; 
  • David Hessl; 
  • Julie B Schweitzer

ABSTRACT

Background:

Researchers are increasingly interested in testing and developing computerized cognitive training interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder due to the limited accessibility of treatments for this disorder. Understanding the feasibility of testing cognitive interventions for this population is critical, especially for individuals with ASD who have low to moderate intellectual ability.

Objective:

The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of computerized cognitive training as measured by attrition rate and a parent satisfaction survey.

Methods:

A total of 26 participants aged 8-17 years with an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and significant intellectual impairment were enrolled (mean age 11.1 years). They were instructed to complete 25 sessions of Cogmed Working Memory Training in 5 to 6 weeks with coach assistance. Attrition rate and parent satisfaction surveys were measured after the completion of training.

Results:

Most participants (96%, 25/26) completed the training and indicated high satisfaction (>88%). However, among the participants who completed the training, 5 participants (19%) were unable to finish in 6 weeks, the recommended training period by Cogmed. Parents noted various positive (eg, voice-overs) and negative (eg, particular graphic and sounds associated with a stimulus) features of the game that they thought affected their child’s response.

Conclusions:

Children with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual impairments can successfully participate in computerized cognitive training interventions but may require additional weeks to complete the training beyond the time needed for children without intellectual impairments. The overall completion rate, with extended time to complete the training, was high. Developers of cognitive training programs for this population should take into account potential issues regarding the noise level of stimuli and characteristics of the visual graphics.


 Citation

Please cite as:

Benyakorn S, Calub CA, Riley SJ, Schneider A, Iosif A, Solomon M, Hessl D, Schweitzer JB

Computerized Cognitive Training in Children With Autism and Intellectual Disabilities: Feasibility and Satisfaction Study

JMIR Mental Health. (forthcoming/in press)

DOI: 10.2196/mental.9564

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/9564

PMID: 29802090

PMCID: 5993974

© The authors. All rights reserved. This is a privileged document currently under peer-review/community review (or an accepted/rejected manuscript). Authors have provided JMIR Publications with an exclusive license to publish this preprint on it's website for review and ahead-of-print citation purposes only. While the final peer-reviewed paper may be licensed under a cc-by license on publication, at this stage authors and publisher expressively prohibit redistribution of this draft paper other than for review purposes.