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Currently accepted at: JMIR Mental Health

Date Submitted: Sep 26, 2017
Open Peer Review Period: Sep 26, 2017 - Oct 27, 2017
Date Accepted: Nov 23, 2017
(closed for review but you can still tweet)

This paper has been accepted and is currently in production.

It will appear shortly on 10.2196/mental.9041

The final accepted version (not copyedited yet) is in this tab.

The final, peer-reviewed published version of this preprint can be found here:

Youth Codesign of a Mobile Phone App to Facilitate Self-Monitoring and Management of Mood Symptoms in Young People With Major Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Self-Harm

Hetrick SE, Robinson J, Burge E, Blandon R, Mobilio B, Rice SM, Simmons MB, Alvarez-Jimenez M, Goodrich S, Davey CG

Youth Codesign of a Mobile Phone App to Facilitate Self-Monitoring and Management of Mood Symptoms in Young People With Major Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Self-Harm

JMIR Ment Health 2018;5(1):e9

DOI: 10.2196/mental.9041

PMID: 29362208

PMCID: 5801516

Youth Codesign of a Mobile Phone App to Facilitate Self-Monitoring and Management of Mood Symptoms in Young People With Major Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Self-Harm

  • Sarah Elisabeth Hetrick; 
  • Jo Robinson; 
  • Eloise Burge; 
  • Ryan Blandon; 
  • Bianca Mobilio; 
  • Simon M Rice; 
  • Magenta B Simmons; 
  • Mario Alvarez-Jimenez; 
  • Simon Goodrich; 
  • Christopher G Davey

ABSTRACT

Background:

Effective treatment of depression in young people is critical, given its prevalence, impacts, and link to suicide. Clinical practice guidelines point to the need for regular monitoring of depression symptom severity and the emergence of suicidal ideation to track treatment progress and guide intervention delivery. Yet, this is seldom integrated in clinical practice.

Objective:

The objective of this study was to address the gap between guidelines about monitoring and real-world practice by codesigning an app with young people that allows for self-monitoring of mood and communication of this monitoring with a clinician.

Methods:

We engaged young people aged 18 to 25 years who had experienced depression, suicidal ideation including those who self-harm, as well as clinicians in a codesign process. We used a human-centered codesign design studio methodology where young people designed the features of the app first individually and then as a group. This resulted in a minimal viable product design, represented through low-fidelity hand-drawn wireframes. Clinicians were engaged throughout the process via focus groups.

Results:

The app incorporated a mood monitoring feature with innovative design aspects that allowed customization, and was named a “well-being tracker” in response to the need for a positive approach to this function. Brief personalized interventions designed to support young people in the intervals between face-to-face appointments were embedded in the app and were immediately available via pop-ups generated by a back-end algorithm within the well-being tracker. Issues regarding the safe incorporation of alerts generated by the app into face-to-face clinical services were raised by clinicians (ie, responding in a timely manner) and will need to be addressed during the full implementation of the app into clinical services.

Conclusions:

The potential to improve outcomes for young people via technology-based enhancement to interventions is enormous. Enhancing communication between young people and their clinicians about symptoms and treatment progress and increasing access to timely and evidence-based interventions are desirable outcomes. To achieve positive outcomes for young people using technology- (app) based interventions, it is critical to understand and incorporate, in a meaningful way, the expectations and motivations of both young people and clinicians.


 Citation

Please cite as:

Hetrick SE, Robinson J, Burge E, Blandon R, Mobilio B, Rice SM, Simmons MB, Alvarez-Jimenez M, Goodrich S, Davey CG

Youth Codesign of a Mobile Phone App to Facilitate Self-Monitoring and Management of Mood Symptoms in Young People With Major Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Self-Harm

JMIR Mental Health. (forthcoming/in press)

DOI: 10.2196/mental.9041

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/9041

PMID: 29362208

PMCID: 5801516

Download Accepted Manuscript PDF

© The authors. All rights reserved. This is a privileged document currently under peer-review/community review (or an accepted/rejected manuscript). Authors have provided JMIR Publications with an exclusive license to publish this preprint on it's website for review and ahead-of-print citation purposes only. While the final peer-reviewed paper may be licensed under a cc-by license on publication, at this stage authors and publisher expressively prohibit redistribution of this draft paper other than for review purposes.