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Currently accepted at: JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Date Submitted: Jun 30, 2017
Open Peer Review Period: Feb 6, 2018 - Apr 3, 2018
Date Accepted: Jan 31, 2018
(closed for review but you can still tweet)

This paper has been accepted and is currently in production.

It will appear shortly on 10.2196/mhealth.8320

The final accepted version (not copyedited yet) is in this tab.

The final, peer-reviewed published version of this preprint can be found here:

Relationship Between Weekly Patterns of Caloric Intake and Reported Weight Loss Outcomes: Retrospective Cohort Study

Hill C, Weir BW, Fuentes LW, Garcia-Alvarez A, Anouti DP, Cheskin LJ

Relationship Between Weekly Patterns of Caloric Intake and Reported Weight Loss Outcomes: Retrospective Cohort Study

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2018;6(4):e83

DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.8320

PMID: 29661750

PMCID: 5928328

Relationship Between Weekly Patterns of Caloric Intake and Reported Weight Loss Outcomes: Retrospective Cohort Study

  • Christine Hill; 
  • Brian W Weir; 
  • Laura W Fuentes; 
  • Alicia Garcia-Alvarez; 
  • Danya P Anouti; 
  • Lawrence J Cheskin

ABSTRACT

Background:

Although millions of overweight and obese adults use mobile phone apps for weight loss, little is known about the predictors of success.

Objective:

The objective of this study was to understand the relationship between weight loss outcomes and weekly patterns of caloric intake among overweight and obese adults using a mobile phone app for weight loss.

Methods:

We examined the relationship between weekly patterns of caloric intake and weight loss outcomes among adults who began using a weight loss app in January 2016 and continued consistent use for at least 5 months (N=7007). Unadjusted and adjusted linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the predictors of percentage of bodyweight lost for women and men separately, including age, body mass index category, weight loss plan, and difference in daily calories consumed on weekend days (Saturday and Sunday) versus Monday.

Results:

In adjusted linear regression, percentage of bodyweight lost was significantly associated with age (for women), body mass index (for men), weight loss plan, and differences in daily caloric intake on Mondays versus weekend days. Compared with women consuming at least 500 calories more on weekend days than on Mondays, those who consumed 50 to 250 calories more on weekend days or those with balanced consumption (±50 calories) lost 1.64% more and 1.82% more bodyweight, respectively. Women consuming 250 to 500 calories or more than 500 calories more on Mondays than on weekend days lost 1.35% more and 3.58% more bodyweight, respectively. Compared with men consuming at least 500 calories more on weekend days than on Mondays, those consuming 250 to 500 calories or more than 500 calories more on Mondays than on weekend days lost 2.27% and 3.42% less bodyweight, respectively.

Conclusions:

Consistent caloric intake on weekend days and Mondays or consuming slightly fewer calories per day on Mondays versus weekend days was associated with more successful weight loss. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03136692; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03136692 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6y9JvHya4)


 Citation

Please cite as:

Hill C, Weir BW, Fuentes LW, Garcia-Alvarez A, Anouti DP, Cheskin LJ

Relationship Between Weekly Patterns of Caloric Intake and Reported Weight Loss Outcomes: Retrospective Cohort Study

JMIR mHealth and uHealth. (forthcoming/in press)

DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.8320

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/8320

PMID: 29661750

PMCID: 5928328

© The authors. All rights reserved. This is a privileged document currently under peer-review/community review (or an accepted/rejected manuscript). Authors have provided JMIR Publications with an exclusive license to publish this preprint on it's website for review and ahead-of-print citation purposes only. While the final peer-reviewed paper may be licensed under a cc-by license on publication, at this stage authors and publisher expressively prohibit redistribution of this draft paper other than for review purposes.