Maintenance Notice

Due to necessary scheduled maintenance, the JMIR Publications website will be unavailable from Monday, March 11, 2019 at 4:00 PM to 4:30 PM EST. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this may cause you.

Who will be affected?

Advertisement

Currently accepted at: JMIR Aging

Date Submitted: Jun 18, 2018
Open Peer Review Period: Jun 21, 2018 - Aug 16, 2018
Date Accepted: Oct 30, 2018
(closed for review but you can still tweet)

This paper has been accepted and is currently in production.

It will appear shortly on 10.2196/11331

The final accepted version (not copyedited yet) is in this tab.

The final, peer-reviewed published version of this preprint can be found here:

Using Actigraphy to Predict Ecological Momentary Assessment of Cognition, Mood, and Fatigue in Older Adulthood

Parsey CM, Schmitter-Edgecombe M

Using Actigraphy to Predict Ecological Momentary Assessment of Cognition, Mood, and Fatigue in Older Adulthood

JMIR Aging 2019;2(1):e11331

DOI: 10.2196/11331

Using Actigraphy to Predict Ecological Momentary Assessment of Cognition, Mood, and Fatigue in Older Adulthood

  • Carolyn M. Parsey; 
  • Maureen Schmitter-Edgecombe

ABSTRACT

Background:

Quality of sleep has been associated with cognitive and mood outcomes in otherwise healthy older adults. However, most studies have evaluated sleep quality as aggregate and/or mean measures, rather than addressing the impact of previous night’s sleep on next-day functioning.

Objective:

This study evaluated the ability of previous night’s sleep parameters on self-reported mood, cognition, and fatigue to understand short-term impacts of sleep quality on next-day functioning.

Methods:

Seventy-three cognitively-healthy older adults (19 male, 54 female) completed seven days of phone-based self-report questions, along with 24-hour actigraph data collection. We evaluated a model of previous night’s sleep parameters as predictors of mood, fatigue, and perceived thinking abilities the following day.

Results:

Previous night’s sleep predicted fatigue in the morning and mid-day, as well as sleepy/drowsiness in the morning; however, sleep measures did not predict subjective report of mood or perceived thinking abilities the following day.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that objectively-measured sleep quality from the previous night may not have a direct or substantial relationship with subjective reporting of cognition or mood the following day, despite frequent patient reports. Continued efforts to examine the relationship between cognition, sleep, and everyday functioning are encouraged.


 Citation

Please cite as:

Parsey CM, Schmitter-Edgecombe M

Using Actigraphy to Predict Ecological Momentary Assessment of Cognition, Mood, and Fatigue in Older Adulthood

JMIR Aging. (forthcoming/in press)

DOI: 10.2196/11331

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/11331

Download Accepted Manuscript PDF

© The authors. All rights reserved. This is a privileged document currently under peer-review/community review (or an accepted/rejected manuscript). Authors have provided JMIR Publications with an exclusive license to publish this preprint on it's website for review and ahead-of-print citation purposes only. While the final peer-reviewed paper may be licensed under a cc-by license on publication, at this stage authors and publisher expressively prohibit redistribution of this draft paper other than for review purposes.