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Currently accepted at: Journal of Medical Internet Research

Date Submitted: Feb 15, 2018
Open Peer Review Period: Feb 16, 2018 - Mar 26, 2018
Date Accepted: Sep 10, 2018
(closed for review but you can still tweet)

This paper has been accepted and is currently in production.

It will appear shortly on 10.2196/10124

The final accepted version (not copyedited yet) is in this tab.

The final, peer-reviewed published version of this preprint can be found here:

Clinical Feasibility of a Just-in-Time Adaptive Intervention App (iREST) as a Behavioral Sleep Treatment in a Military Population: Pilot Study

Pulantara IW, Parmanto B, Germain A

Clinical Feasibility of a Just-in-Time Adaptive Intervention App (iREST) as a Behavioral Sleep Treatment in a Military Population: Pilot Study

J Med Internet Res 2018;20(12):e10124

DOI: 10.2196/10124

PMID: 30530452

PMCID: 6303679

Clinical Feasibility of a Just-in-Time Adaptive Intervention App (iREST) as a Behavioral Sleep Treatment in a Military Population: Pilot Study

  • I Wayan Pulantara; 
  • Bambang Parmanto; 
  • Anne Germain

ABSTRACT

Background:

Although evidence-based cognitive behavioral sleep treatments have been shown to be safe and effective, these treatments have limited scalability. Mobile health tools can address this scalability challenge. iREST, or interactive Resilience Enhancing Sleep Tactics, is a mobile health platform designed to provide a just-in-time adaptive intervention (JITAI) in the assessment, monitoring, and delivery of evidence-based sleep recommendations in a scalable and personalized manner. The platform includes a mobile phone–based patient app linked to a clinician portal.

Objective:

The first aim of the pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of JITAI using the iREST platform for delivering evidence-based sleep interventions in a sample of military service members and veterans. The second aim was to explore the potential effectiveness of this treatment delivery form relative to habitual in-person delivery.

Methods:

In this pilot study, military service members and veterans between the ages of 18 and 60 years who reported clinically significant service-related sleep disturbances were enrolled as participants. Participants were asked to use iREST for a period of 4 to 6 weeks during which time they completed a daily sleep/wake diary. Through the clinician portal, trained clinicians offered recommendations consistent with evidence-based behavioral sleep treatments on weeks 2 through 4. To explore potential effectiveness, self-report measures were used, including the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the PSQI Addendum for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

Results:

A total of 27 participants completed the posttreatment assessments. Between pre- and postintervention, clinically and statistically significant improvements in primary and secondary outcomes were detected (eg, a mean reduction on the ISI of 9.96, t26=9.99, P<.001). At posttreatment, 70% (19/27) of participants met the criteria for treatment response and 59% (16/27) achieved remission. Comparing these response and remission rates with previously published results for in-person trials showed no significant differences. Conclusion: Participants who received evidence-based recommendations from their assigned clinicians through the iREST platform showed clinically significant improvements in insomnia severity, overall sleep quality, and disruptive nocturnal disturbances. These findings are promising, and a larger noninferiority clinical trial is warranted.


 Citation

Please cite as:

Pulantara IW, Parmanto B, Germain A

Clinical Feasibility of a Just-in-Time Adaptive Intervention App (iREST) as a Behavioral Sleep Treatment in a Military Population: Pilot Study

Journal of Medical Internet Research. (forthcoming/in press)

DOI: 10.2196/10124

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/10124

PMID: 30530452

PMCID: 6303679

Per the author's request the PDF is not available.

© The authors. All rights reserved. This is a privileged document currently under peer-review/community review (or an accepted/rejected manuscript). Authors have provided JMIR Publications with an exclusive license to publish this preprint on it's website for review and ahead-of-print citation purposes only. While the final peer-reviewed paper may be licensed under a cc-by license on publication, at this stage authors and publisher expressively prohibit redistribution of this draft paper other than for review purposes.