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Currently accepted at: JMIR Serious Games

Date Submitted: Feb 14, 2018
Open Peer Review Period: Feb 15, 2018 - Apr 19, 2018
Date Accepted: Jul 12, 2018
(closed for review but you can still tweet)

This paper has been accepted and is currently in production.

It will appear shortly on 10.2196/10116

The final accepted version (not copyedited yet) is in this tab.

The final, peer-reviewed published version of this preprint can be found here:

Active video games for rehabilitation in respiratory conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Simmich J, Deacon AJ, Russell TG

Active video games for rehabilitation in respiratory conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

JMIR Serious Games 2019;7(1):e10116

DOI: 10.2196/10116

PMID: 30801256

PMCID: 6409512

Active video games for rehabilitation in respiratory conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

  • Joshua Simmich; 
  • Anthony J Deacon; 
  • Trevor G Russell

ABSTRACT

Background:

Exercise and physical activity are key components of treatment for chronic respiratory diseases. However, physical activity levels and adherence to exercise programs is low in people with these diseases. Active video games (AVG) may provide a more engaging alternative to traditional forms of exercise.

Objective:

This review examines the effectiveness of game-based interventions on physiological outcome measures, as well as adherence and enjoyment, in subjects with chronic respiratory diseases.

Methods:

A systematic search of the literature was conducted, with full-texts and abstracts included where they involved an AVG intervention for participants diagnosed with respiratory conditions. A narrative synthesis of included studies was performed. In addition, meta-analysis comparing AVGs to traditional exercise was undertaken for four outcome measures: mean heart rate (HR) during exercise, peripheral blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) during exercise, dyspnoea induced by the exercise and enjoyment of the exercise.

Results:

A total of 13 full-text articles corresponding to 12 studies were included in the review. Interventions predominantly used games released for the Nintendo WiiTM (eight studies) and Microsoft Xbox KinectTM (three studies). Trials conducted over more than one session varied in duration between 3 and 12 weeks. In these, AVG interventions were associated with either similar or slightly greater improvements in outcomes such as exercise capacity when compared a traditional exercise control and also generally demonstrated improvements over baseline or non-intervention comparators. There were few studies of unsupervised AVG interventions, but these reported adherence was high and maintained throughout the intervention period. In addition, AVGs were generally reported to be well-liked and considered feasible by participants. For outcome measures measured during a single exercise session, there was no significant difference between AVGs and traditional exercise for HR (mean difference=1.44 beats per minute, 95% CI (confidence interval) [-14.31, 17.18]), SpO2 (mean difference=1.12 percentage points, 95% CI [-1.91, 4.16]) and dyspnoea (mean difference=0.43 Borg units, 95% CI [-0.79, 1.66]), but AVGs were significantly more enjoyable than traditional exercise (standardised mean difference=1.36, (95% CI [0.04, 2.68]).

Conclusions:

This review provides evidence that AVG interventions, undertaken for several weeks, can provide similar or greater improvements in exercise capacity and other outcomes as traditional exercise. Within a single session of cardiovascular exercise, AVGs can evoke similar physiological responses as traditional exercise modalities but are more enjoyable to subjects with chronic respiratory diseases. However, there is very limited evidence for adherence and effectiveness in long-term unsupervised trials, which should be the focus of future research.


 Citation

Please cite as:

Simmich J, Deacon AJ, Russell TG

Active video games for rehabilitation in respiratory conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

JMIR Serious Games. (forthcoming/in press)

DOI: 10.2196/10116

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/10116

PMID: 30801256

PMCID: 6409512

Per the author's request the PDF is not available.

© The authors. All rights reserved. This is a privileged document currently under peer-review/community review (or an accepted/rejected manuscript). Authors have provided JMIR Publications with an exclusive license to publish this preprint on it's website for review and ahead-of-print citation purposes only. While the final peer-reviewed paper may be licensed under a cc-by license on publication, at this stage authors and publisher expressively prohibit redistribution of this draft paper other than for review purposes.