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Currently accepted at: JMIR Mental Health

Date Submitted: Feb 13, 2018
Open Peer Review Period: Feb 13, 2018 - Jun 17, 2018
Date Accepted: Jun 17, 2018
(closed for review but you can still tweet)

This paper has been accepted and is currently in production.

It will appear shortly on 10.2196/10091

The final accepted version (not copyedited yet) is in this tab.

The final, peer-reviewed published version of this preprint can be found here:

Early Psychosis Service User Views on Digital Technology: Qualitative Analysis

Bucci S, Morris R, Berry K, Berry N, Haddock G, Barrowclough C, Lewis S, Edge D

Early Psychosis Service User Views on Digital Technology: Qualitative Analysis

JMIR Ment Health 2018;5(4):e10091

DOI: 10.2196/10091

PMID: 30381280

PMCID: 6236205

Early Psychosis Service User Views on Digital Technology: Qualitative Analysis

  • Sandra Bucci; 
  • Rohan Morris; 
  • Katherine Berry; 
  • Natalie Berry; 
  • Gillian Haddock; 
  • Christine Barrowclough; 
  • Shôn Lewis; 
  • Dawn Edge

ABSTRACT

Background:

Digital technology has the potential to improve outcomes for people with psychosis. However, to date, research has largely ignored service user views on digital health interventions (DHIs).

Objective:

The objective of our study was to explore early psychosis service users’ subjective views on DHIs.

Methods:

Framework analysis was undertaken with data obtained from 21 semistructured interviews with people registered with early intervention for psychosis services. Robust measures were used to develop a stable framework, including member checking, triangulation, independent verification of themes, and consensus meetings.

Results:

The following 4 themes were established a priori: acceptability of technology in psychosis and mental health; technology increasing access to and augmenting mental health support; barriers to adopting DHIs; and concerns about management of data protection, privacy, risk, and security of information. The following 2 themes were generated a posteriori: blending DHIs with face-to-face treatment and empowerment, control, and choice. DHIs were also viewed as potentially destigmatizing, overcoming barriers faced in traditional service settings, facilitating communication, and empowering service users to take active control of their health care.

Conclusions:

In the first study of its kind, early psychosis service users’ were largely positive about the potential use of DHIs supporting and managing mental health. Overall, service users felt that DHIs were a progressive, modern, and relevant platform for health care delivery. Concerns were expressed around privacy and data security and practical barriers inherent within DHIs, all of which require further attention. Future research should explore whether findings transfer to other service user groups, other technology delivery formats, and across a range of treatment modalities.


 Citation

Please cite as:

Bucci S, Morris R, Berry K, Berry N, Haddock G, Barrowclough C, Lewis S, Edge D

Early Psychosis Service User Views on Digital Technology: Qualitative Analysis

JMIR Mental Health. (forthcoming/in press)

DOI: 10.2196/10091

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/10091

PMID: 30381280

PMCID: 6236205

© The authors. All rights reserved. This is a privileged document currently under peer-review/community review (or an accepted/rejected manuscript). Authors have provided JMIR Publications with an exclusive license to publish this preprint on it's website for review and ahead-of-print citation purposes only. While the final peer-reviewed paper may be licensed under a cc-by license on publication, at this stage authors and publisher expressively prohibit redistribution of this draft paper other than for review purposes.